It's Very Beautiful Over There

I'm Sarah. I like books and shitty (awesome) TV shows. Glee and stuff- so sorry. Check out my tags because I worked hard on them.

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    humansofnewyork:

“We fled to the Philippines, which was under American occupation at the time. But it wasn’t long before the Japanese took over the islands. We were living in Manila, and when the Japanese occupied the city, they began to teach us to read and write Japanese. When the Americans came to retake the city, they invaded from the north, and the Japanese blew up the bridges and barricaded themselves in the southern part of the city where we lived. Shells were falling all around us, because the Japanese had stationed a gun encampment across from our house. One morning, we decided to make a run for the hospital, so that we could put ourselves under the protection of the Red Cross. Our neighbors were running in front of us, pushing their belongings on a pushcart, when they stepped on a land mine and the whole family was killed. We kept running, but when we got to the main street, there was a checkpoint and we weren’t allowed to cross. So we hid beneath a house, and soon we were discovered by Japanese soldiers. They lined us all up against the wall to be executed. We begged and begged and begged for our lives. They finally allowed my mother and the children to step aside, but they told my father to stay. My mother dropped to her knees and asked the Japanese commander to imagine it was his family. And he finally let all of us go.”

    humansofnewyork:

    “We fled to the Philippines, which was under American occupation at the time. But it wasn’t long before the Japanese took over the islands. We were living in Manila, and when the Japanese occupied the city, they began to teach us to read and write Japanese. When the Americans came to retake the city, they invaded from the north, and the Japanese blew up the bridges and barricaded themselves in the southern part of the city where we lived. Shells were falling all around us, because the Japanese had stationed a gun encampment across from our house. One morning, we decided to make a run for the hospital, so that we could put ourselves under the protection of the Red Cross. Our neighbors were running in front of us, pushing their belongings on a pushcart, when they stepped on a land mine and the whole family was killed. We kept running, but when we got to the main street, there was a checkpoint and we weren’t allowed to cross. So we hid beneath a house, and soon we were discovered by Japanese soldiers. They lined us all up against the wall to be executed. We begged and begged and begged for our lives. They finally allowed my mother and the children to step aside, but they told my father to stay. My mother dropped to her knees and asked the Japanese commander to imagine it was his family. And he finally let all of us go.”

    #wow
    black-belt-in-origami:

jessehimself:

Pennsylvania Judge Sentenced For 28 Years For Selling Kids to the Prison System
Mark Ciavarella Jr, a 61-year old former judge in Pennsylvania, has been sentenced to nearly 30 years in prison for literally selling young juveniles for cash. He was convicted of accepting money in exchange for incarcerating thousands of adults and children into a prison facility owned by a developer who was paying him under the table. The kickbacks amounted to more than $1 million.The Pennsylvania Supreme Court has overturned some 4,000 convictions issued by him between 2003 and 2008, claiming he violated the constitutional rights of the juveniles – including the right to legal counsel and the right to intelligently enter a plea. Some of the juveniles he sentenced were as young as 10-years old.Ciavarella was convicted of 12 counts, including racketeering, money laundering, mail fraud and tax evasion. He was also ordered to repay $1.2 million in restitution.His “kids for cash” program has revealed that corruption is indeed within the prison system, mostly driven by the growth in private prisons seeking profits by any means necessary.
—-
Why might this not be a HUGE national story and his name not household? I’ll give you one guess what color those kids were.

what in the everloving fuck

    black-belt-in-origami:

    jessehimself:

    Pennsylvania Judge Sentenced For 28 Years For Selling Kids to the Prison System

    Mark Ciavarella Jr, a 61-year old former judge in Pennsylvania, has been sentenced to nearly 30 years in prison for literally selling young juveniles for cash. He was convicted of accepting money in exchange for incarcerating thousands of adults and children into a prison facility owned by a developer who was paying him under the table. The kickbacks amounted to more than $1 million.

    The Pennsylvania Supreme Court has overturned some 4,000 convictions issued by him between 2003 and 2008, claiming he violated the constitutional rights of the juveniles – including the right to legal counsel and the right to intelligently enter a plea. Some of the juveniles he sentenced were as young as 10-years old.

    Ciavarella was convicted of 12 counts, including racketeering, money laundering, mail fraud and tax evasion. He was also ordered to repay $1.2 million in restitution.

    His “kids for cash” program has revealed that corruption is indeed within the prison system, mostly driven by the growth in private prisons seeking profits by any means necessary.

    —-

    Why might this not be a HUGE national story and his name not household? I’ll give you one guess what color those kids were.

    what in the everloving fuck

    #wow #wow #leo #I have so many leo feelings #angel #furt #wow #wow #feminism #wow #otp: he loves you
    thehpalliance:

Our Executive Director Andrew Slack discusses some of his thoughts and feelings on the tragic loss of Cory Monteith:"So. Cory died from a disease he actively had for the last two decades: the mental illness that is drug addiction. I had a strong feeling that this was the cause of death given his long term struggle with this. The disease of drug addiction happens to be one that has directly effected people in my life who I love the most - and therefore it has effected me. Our culture still views the disease as a moral illness when in fact it is a mental one. Our culture has a very immature attitude in dealing with complex problems and drug addiction is a very, very complex problem. Like most mental illness, it is hard for the culture at large to accept it as outside of the person’s control the way we accept Type 1 diabetes as outside of a child’s control. And it is true, that unlike Type 1 diabetes, addicts have some degree of agency. There is hope that they can get out of the disease based on decisions that they ultimately make. Cory made decisions over the course of two decades that showed he was a fighter. Even in March, he voluntarily checked in to rehab. This did not guarantee that he would survive the disease.And the small window of reality that there was a chance that that person could have survived if only they had done something different. Or the notion that drugs are done by ‘the bad people.’ I want to say this: it is understandable that our culture feels this way. Human blame is an instant reaction to the human condition of suffering. But our culture’s attitude that drug addiction is somehow a moral failing of an individual is more dangerous than drug addiction itself. Drug addiction is a disease that needs serious treatment. But so does our culture’s response to drug addiction, to mental illness in general, and to all disease.It hits on an even larger issue: the sociology of birth and death. We live in a culture where death is so feared that we would rather keep people miserable, hooked up on to machines in order to preserve the ‘sanctity of life’ rather than the ‘dignity of life.’ The technocratic Muggle Minded culture views death as a defeat. And therefore, any one who dies as having lost. Voldemort felt this way about his mother. Most of us feel this way toward death, on some level and it’s encouraged by our culture at large.This issue gets magnified when someone is actively injecting poison into their body that will make them die or at the very least cower away from the reality of their feelings.So let me say this. I only knew Cory through his acting on Glee. I didn’t know him the way other Gleeks know him and I certainly don’t know him the way his friends and family know him. But I still can say this: he was not a loser. He was a winner. And he survived under the condition of a disease that one does not receive accolades or awards for surviving. It is very difficult for any one to understand what an addict goes through - including the addict. This also hits on other issues around how we allow for grief and mourning and making space for it even when the way we knew that person was through the boundary of a screen. But my hope is that we can have a larger discussion around addiction as well. And I sincerely hope that if any ignorant and sociologically sick individuals are putting any thing up on the Internet that Cory is to blame for his own death, etc - that the Glee community can stand by and celebrate his strength. In the words of Jonathan Larson, ‘To people living with, living with, living with…not dying from disease.’ And even when we die from disease - and all of us will die, to not view that as somehow ‘not alive’ - but to change our paradigm as to how this works.This is immensely complicated and difficult. But we must remove blame from those who suffer from mental illness while at the same time allowing them space to find their own agency in the midst of their recovery.Cory died. His spirit lives. Through the power of music and the power of performance and story - we can tell a different story about addiction and disease than the dominant story we hear in our culture’s muggle minded paradigm. One that celebrates rather than condemns. That loves rather than fears. That empathizes rather than pities.I’m going to say that last one again: ‘That empathizes rather than pities.’ Please think on that. So many of us would rather pity than empathize. Fix pain rather than be with it. So much more to say. Including the fact that our entire culture has the mindset of that as an addict and all of us need spiritual recovery from the depletion that we have suffered from. I cried when when my suspicions were confirmed that Cory died from this disease and it hit a very personal chord. This is very, very, very sad. Beyond any thing I can really say in an attempt at eloquent words. The loss is real, palpable, and truly tragic beyond measure.”

    thehpalliance:

    Our Executive Director Andrew Slack discusses some of his thoughts and feelings on the tragic loss of Cory Monteith:

    "So. Cory died from a disease he actively had for the last two decades: the mental illness that is drug addiction. I had a strong feeling that this was the cause of death given his long term struggle with this. The disease of drug addiction happens to be one that has directly effected people in my life who I love the most - and therefore it has effected me. Our culture still views the disease as a moral illness when in fact it is a mental one. 

    Our culture has a very immature attitude in dealing with complex problems and drug addiction is a very, very complex problem. 

    Like most mental illness, it is hard for the culture at large to accept it as outside of the person’s control the way we accept Type 1 diabetes as outside of a child’s control. And it is true, that unlike Type 1 diabetes, addicts have some degree of agency. There is hope that they can get out of the disease based on decisions that they ultimately make. Cory made decisions over the course of two decades that showed he was a fighter. Even in March, he voluntarily checked in to rehab. This did not guarantee that he would survive the disease.

    And the small window of reality that there was a chance that that person could have survived if only they had done something different. Or the notion that drugs are done by ‘the bad people.’ I want to say this: it is understandable that our culture feels this way. Human blame is an instant reaction to the human condition of suffering. But our culture’s attitude that drug addiction is somehow a moral failing of an individual is more dangerous than drug addiction itself. Drug addiction is a disease that needs serious treatment. But so does our culture’s response to drug addiction, to mental illness in general, and to all disease.

    It hits on an even larger issue: the sociology of birth and death. We live in a culture where death is so feared that we would rather keep people miserable, hooked up on to machines in order to preserve the ‘sanctity of life’ rather than the ‘dignity of life.’ The technocratic Muggle Minded culture views death as a defeat. And therefore, any one who dies as having lost. Voldemort felt this way about his mother. Most of us feel this way toward death, on some level and it’s encouraged by our culture at large.

    This issue gets magnified when someone is actively injecting poison into their body that will make them die or at the very least cower away from the reality of their feelings.

    So let me say this. I only knew Cory through his acting on Glee. I didn’t know him the way other Gleeks know him and I certainly don’t know him the way his friends and family know him. But I still can say this: he was not a loser. He was a winner. And he survived under the condition of a disease that one does not receive accolades or awards for surviving. It is very difficult for any one to understand what an addict goes through - including the addict. 

    This also hits on other issues around how we allow for grief and mourning and making space for it even when the way we knew that person was through the boundary of a screen. But my hope is that we can have a larger discussion around addiction as well. 

    And I sincerely hope that if any ignorant and sociologically sick individuals are putting any thing up on the Internet that Cory is to blame for his own death, etc - that the Glee community can stand by and celebrate his strength. In the words of Jonathan Larson, ‘To people living with, living with, living with…not dying from disease.’ And even when we die from disease - and all of us will die, to not view that as somehow ‘not alive’ - but to change our paradigm as to how this works.

    This is immensely complicated and difficult. But we must remove blame from those who suffer from mental illness while at the same time allowing them space to find their own agency in the midst of their recovery.

    Cory died. His spirit lives. Through the power of music and the power of performance and story - we can tell a different story about addiction and disease than the dominant story we hear in our culture’s muggle minded paradigm. One that celebrates rather than condemns. That loves rather than fears. That empathizes rather than pities.

    I’m going to say that last one again: ‘That empathizes rather than pities.’ Please think on that. So many of us would rather pity than empathize. Fix pain rather than be with it. 

    So much more to say. Including the fact that our entire culture has the mindset of that as an addict and all of us need spiritual recovery from the depletion that we have suffered from. 

    I cried when when my suspicions were confirmed that Cory died from this disease and it hit a very personal chord. This is very, very, very sad. Beyond any thing I can really say in an attempt at eloquent words. The loss is real, palpable, and truly tragic beyond measure.”

    #wow #angel #wow #person: i believe in you #listen up #pics #i'm sorry #i think i am short circuiting???? #this is one of the best things i think i have ever seen in my life? #otp: home #wow wowwwwwwwwwwwwwwww #omg #i really am uh #wow #uhm wha

    teamgif:

    andrvw:

    teamgif:

    andrvw:

    people who drink the left over milk in their cereal bowls are SICK FUCKS

    I DONT KNOW WHERE YOU ARE FROM BUT HERE IN MELBOURNE WE DONT WASTE MILK GOD DAMN IT I AM SO MAD THAT SHIT EXPENSIVE 

    is your caps lock broken or are you really this passionate about milk

    milk is the only thing i have left

    #wow